FAQ

  1. What are sealants?
  2. What problems could my child have?
  3. Will Teething make my child ill?
  4. When do their teeth erupt?
  5. When should my child first see a dentist?
  6. Why should my kids see a Pediatric Dentist and not just my dentist?
  7. They’re just baby teeth. Won’t they fall out anyway?
  8. Do you accept my insurance?
  9. Are you open Saturdays?
  10. What can I expect during my child’s first visit?
  11. What causes tooth decay?
  12. What is “baby-bottle” tooth decay?
  13. What kind of toothbrush should my child use?
  14. Tips for cavity prevention.
  15. What helpful information can you give me regarding tooth decay in infants?
  16. Should I eliminate all sugar and starch from my child’s diet?
  17. How do I create a diet safe for my child’s teeth?
  18. Can my child’s diet affect their dental health?
  19. What is an appropriate diet for my child?
  20. How do I know if my child is getting the right amount of fluoride in their diet?
  21. When should I start brushing my child’s teeth
  22. How should I brush my child’s teeth?
  23. Is it really pain-FREE?
  • 1What are sealants?

    Tooth Sealants refer to a plastic which a dentist bonds into the grooves of the chewing surface of a tooth as a means of helping to cavities. In many cases, it is near impossible for children to clean the tiny pits and grooves on the chewing surfaces of their teeth. When a sealant is applied, the surface of the tooth is somewhat flatter and smoother. There are no longer any places on the chewing part of the tooth that the bristles of a toothbrush can’t reach and clean. Since plaque can be removed more easily and effectively, there is much less chance that decay will start.

  • 2What problems could my child have?

    Some dental problems begin very early in life. Tooth decay continues to be the most common chronic disease of childhood. One big concern is Early Childhood Caries (ECC) also known as baby bottle tooth decay. Children risk severe tooth decay from using a bottle at night. Untreated caries in the young child could exacerbate and may cause infection and threat to the health of children.

  • 3Will Teething make my child ill?

    Many children do become irritable, run a fever and have other symptoms when they are teething. These are to be expected and should not cause worry. Teething itself is not the cause of any childhood illness. The best action to take to aid discomfort is clean your baby’s mouth with a damp gauze pad and giving your baby a teething ring to chew on.

  • 4When do their teeth erupt?

    Children’s teeth begin forming before birth. The first baby teeth that come into the mouth are the two bottom front teeth. You will notice this when your baby is about 6-8 months old. Next to follow will be the four upper front teeth and the remainder of your baby’s teeth will appear periodically.
    They will usually appear in pairs along the sides of the jaw until the child is about three years old. The pace and order to their eruption also varies.

    The first permanent teeth will begin to erupt between the ages of 5 and 6 starting with the first molars and lower central incisors. Some of the permanent teeth replace babyteeth and some don’t. This process will continue until approximately age 16-18. Adults will eventually end up with 32 permanent teeth including the wisdom teeth.

    Don’t worry if some teeth are a few months early or late as all children have different eruption patterns.

  • 5When should my child first see a dentist?

    Your child should visit the dentist by his/her first birthday. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future, and get them used to going to the dentist. We are trying to build good health habits and that’s what we start with at that first visit. You and your child will learn about diet, nutrition, tooth brushing and flossing. That’s right – Flossing.

  • 6Why should my kids see a Pediatric Dentist and not just my dentist?

    We all want the best for our kids. And they deserve it. Many general dentists are very competent and do great dentistry. But they don’t have the experience and training of a specialist in children’s dentistry. In the same way that pediatricians are trained to meet a child’s medical needs, our pediatric dental specialists are uniquely qualified to protect your child’s oral health using the most advanced techniques and materials. Pediatric dentists have an additional two to three years of specialty training in addition to four years of dental school and four years of college study. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

    Our pediatric dental specialists and team members love children and are specially trained to put them at ease. Our incredibly fun “Dental Theme Park” environment is specially designed to make patients and our parents more comfortable. We have many parents tell us that their kids can’t wait to go to the dentist. and beg to come back Don’t take my word for it, Check us out , you’ll be surprised.

  • 7They’re just baby teeth. Won’t they fall out anyway?

    Baby teeth are important for several reasons. They add to an attractive appearance by helping children feel good about themselves. They help maintain good nutrition with proper chewing and eating. They help in speech development in allowing good pronunciation and speech habits. Healthy baby teeth allow normal development of the jaw bones and muscles and help guide the proper eruption of the permanent teeth into the right place.
    Early loss of primary teeth can ultimately lead to crooked teeth, space loss, and the need for braces. Decayed baby teeth can cause pain, abscesses, infections, and can spread to the permanent teeth. Take good care of them. They may not be the only teeth you’ll get but they’re the only teeth you have right now.

  • 8Do you accept my insurance?

    “Dr. Stella’s FUNtastic Dental and Orthodontics recognizes how important it is to our patients that their dental insurance covers as much of their child’s treatment as possible and we make every effort to make that happen. But ultimately, insurance benefits are a contract between you and your employer.”
    “We’ll be happy to help you with any insurance concerns you have. Many patients ask if we take their dental insurance. We accept insurance benefits provided by all PPO and indemnity plans. In other words, if you have the freedom to choose the dentist you go to, we will work with your dental plan. If your dental plan specifies that you need to go to a doctor on a particular list, check to see if you have the option of using out-of-network benefits. We partner with our patients to help maximize their dental benefits. As a courtesy, we will bill your dental plan for you. We ask that the patient pay the estimated portion the dental plan is not going to cover for dental services at the time of the service. If you want to know how your insurance works call our office at (562) 627-8800 and we will be happy to assist you with any dental insurance questions you may have – No hard sells – No hassles – No hard feelings… We just want to give you answers to your questions.”

  • 9Are you open Saturdays?

    As a convenience to you we are open Saturdays from 9 AM to 2 PM

  • 10What can I expect during my child’s first visit?

    You can expect to be surprised. Surprised at how well they do. The doctor will do a complete exam of their teeth and gums. One of our staff expertly trained in treating children will do a professional cleaning, fluoride treatment and any necessary x-rays, followed by tooth brushing and flossing instructions. The doctor will then take all the time you need to explain any needed treatment and answer all your questions.

  • 11What causes tooth decay?

    Several specific types of bacteria that live on the teeth cause decay. When sugar is consumed the bacteria use the sugar and then manufacture acids that dissolve the teeth and cause an infection in the tooth. This infection is called decay.

  • 12What is “baby-bottle” tooth decay?

    Babies who go to bed with a bottle of milk, formula or juice are more likely to get tooth decay. Because the sugar in formula, milk or juice stays in contact with the teeth for a long time during the night, the teeth can decay quickly.

    Here are some tips to avoid baby-bottle tooth decay:

    • Put your child to bed with a bottle of plain water, not milk or juice.
    • Stop nursing when your child is asleep or has stopped sucking on the bottle.
    • Try not to let your child walk around using a bottle of milk or juice as a pacifier.
    • Start to teach your child to drink from a cup at about 6 months of age. Plan to stop using a bottle by 12 to 14 months at the latest.
    • Don’t dip your child’s pacifier in honey or sugar.
  • 13What kind of toothbrush should my child use?

    Children’s hands and mouths are different than adults. They need to use toothbrushes designed for children. Both adults and children should use brushes with soft, rounded bristles for gentle cleaning. Change to a new brush about every three months.

  • 14Tips for cavity prevention.

    •  Limit Frequency of meals and snacks.
    •  Encourage brushing, flossing and rinsing.
    •  Watch what you drink.
    •  Avoid sticky foods.
    •  Make treats part of meals.
    •  Choose nutritious snacks.

    The first baby teeth come into the mouth are the two bottom front teeth. You will notice this when your baby is about 6-8 months old. Next to follow will be the 4 upper front teeth and the remainder of your baby’s teeth will appear periodically. They will usually appear in pairs along the sides of the jaw until the child is about 2 1/2 years old.

    At around 2 1/2 years old your child should have all 20 teeth. Between the ages of 5 and 6 the first permanent teeth will begin to erupt. Some of the permanent teeth replace baby teeth and some don’t. Don’t worry if some teeth are a few months early or late as all children are different.

    Baby teeth are important as they not only hold space for permanent teeth but they are important to chewing, biting, speech and appearance.

    For this reason it is important to maintain a healthy diet and daily hygiene.

  • 15What helpful information can you give me regarding tooth decay in infants?

    Most importantly, don’t nurse your children to sleep. Nor should you put them to bed with a bottle of milk, juice or formula. When a child is sleeping, any liquid that remains in the mouth can support the bacteria that produce acid and harm the teeth. A simple pacifier or bottle of water is fine.

    Limiting sugar intake and brushing regularly can help prevent cavities. The longer it takes your child to chew their foods the longer the residue stays on their teeth, the greater the chances of getting cavities.

    Every time someone eats, an acid reaction occurs inside their mouth as the bacteria digest the sugars. This reaction lasts approximately 20 minutes. During this time the acid environment can destroy the tooth structure, eventually leading to cavities.

    Consistency of a person’s saliva also makes a difference. Thinner saliva breaks up food and washes it away more quickly. When a person diet is high in carbohydrates and sugars they tend to have thicker saliva, which in turn creates a more acid-producing bacteria environment that causes cavities.

  • 16Should I eliminate all sugar and starch from my child’s diet?

    Of course not. Many of these foods are incredibly important to your child’s health. Starch based foods are much safer to eat for teeth when eaten with an entire meal. Foods that stick to teeth are also more difficult to wash away by water, saliva or other drinks. Its important you talk to our staff about your child’s diet and maintaining proper dental care.

  • 17How do I create a diet safe for my child’s teeth?

    As we stated earlier, initiate a balanced diet. Analyze the frequency in which starch based foods are eaten. These types of foods include breads, pasta, potato chips, etc. In addition, sugar is found in more than just candy. All types of sugars can promote tooth decay. For example, most milk-based products contain sugar. A Peanut butter and jelly sandwich is a favorite for bag lunches. Unfortunately, it includes sugar not only in the jelly, but also in the peanut butter. For less sugar and more flavor and nutrients, try replacing jelly with fresh fruit slices (apples, pears, or bananas) or chopped dried fruit. Go easy on the peanut butter, though—it’s high in fat. Choose the “no-salt-added” kind for less sodium.

  • 18Can my child’s diet affect their dental health?

    Absolutely. It is important that you initiate a balanced diet for your child so that their teeth develop appropriately. In addition, this will positively affect healthy gum tissue surrounding the teeth. Please note that a diet high in sugar and other forms of carbohydrates may increase the probability of tooth decay.

  • 19What is an appropriate diet for my child?

    It is important that your child receives a naturally balanced diet that includes the important nutrients your child needs in order to grow. A daily diet that includes the major food groups of Meat, Fish and Eggs, Vegetables and Fruits, Breads and Cereals as well as Milk and Other Dairy Products.

  • 20How do I know if my child is getting the right amount of fluoride in their diet?

    It is important that your child receives a naturally balanced diet that includes the important nutrients your child needs in order to grow. A daily diet that includes the major food groups of Meat, Fish and Eggs, Vegetables and Fruits, Breads and Cereals as well as Milk and Other Dairy Products.

  • 21When should I start brushing my child’s teeth

    Once your child’s teeth begin erupting, you can begin cleaning them by wiping them with a moist washcloth. As your child gets more teeth, you can begin to use a soft child’s toothbrush. You should use just a pea-size amount of a fluoride toothpaste or a non-fluoride toothpaste (like Baby OraGel) until your child is able to spit it out (too much fluoride can stain their teeth).

    For most toddlers, getting them to brush their teeth can be quite a challenge.

    Some suggestions for making tooth brushing less of a battle can include:

    • letting him brush your teeth at the same time
    • letting him pick out a few toothbrushes with his favorite characters and giving him a choice of which one he wants to use each time (this will give him some feeling of control over the situation)
    • let him brush his own teeth first (you will likely have to “help out”).
    • read some children’s books about tooth brushing.
    • Or have everyone brush their teeth at the same time.

    To help him understand the importance of brushing, it can be sometimes fun and helpful to let him eat or drink something that will ‘stain’ his teeth temporarily, and then let him brush them clean. It can also be a good idea to create a “tooth brushing routine” and stick to the same routine each day.

  • 22How should I brush my child’s teeth?

    Wipe infant’s teeth gently with a moist, soft cloth or gauze square. As babies grow, use a child’s toothbrush with a small, pea-sized dab of toothpaste. By age 2 or 3 begin to teach your child to brush. You will still need to brush where they miss. Dentists and hygienists often advise children to use a gentle, short, back and forth motion to remove plaque. When children are older they can switch to this method.

    • Hold the brush at an angle (45 degrees) towards teeth and gums. Move brush back and forth with short strokes, about a half tooth wide.
    • Brush the inside and outside surfaces of each tooth, top and bottom.
    • Hold the brush flat on top of the teeth and brush the chewing surfaces.
    • Gently brush the tongue to remove debris.
    • Floss between teeth daily.
  • 23Is it really pain-FREE?

    We do everything possible to make your child’s visit Pain-FREE, Anxiety-FREE, and Fun. From the latest technologies to the newest techniques, together with our “Dental Theme Park” atmosphere, we deliver a total experience that is pain-FREE or as close to pain-FREE as you can possibly get.